Term of Today: Tiyb

As it turns out, I can cook (Tiyb), more or less.

Advertisements

I’ve never truly been in a situation where I’ve had to Tiyb for myself. College is a big exception, but even then I had many options – healthy and otherwise – to eat outside my dorm or apartment. Another exception is when I worked at the Oregon legislature and lived in a small house nearby. I had a functional kitchen, but I shared it with two others, and I still had delicious options on the legislature’s campus and elsewhere.

20170213_120759-01

Now that I’m in my own house, my kitchen has become a little home within my home. Though I do have several little food joints in my site, I am trying to use PC as a way to learn to Tiyb.

My first full-on meal took three hours to make. Enjoy the recipe below!

Pollo Asado Fries on February 3, 2017

Ingredients:
  • 1 buta tank (125 DH for the initial purchase, only 50 DH for refills)
  • 1 valve with rubber washer (15 DH)
  • 1 extra rubber washer (0.5 DH)
  • 1 two-meter buta hose (8.5 DH)
  • 2 valve clasps (1 DH each)
  • 1 pan (25 DH)
  • 1 three-burner stove (200 DH)
  • Lighter (free, leftover from previous Volunteer)
  • Leatherman multi-tool ($65, bring with you from the US; optional)
  • 1/2 chicken (30 DH)
  • 3 avocados (~15 DH, bought in bulk)
  • 1 extra-large potato (~2 DH, bought in bulk)
  • 1/2 red onion (~0.5 DH, bought in bulk)
  • 1/2 tomato (~1 DH, bought in bulk)
  • cilantro (1 DH for one bundle)
  • olive oil (45 DH for 1.5 liter)
Recipe (serves 3 or one very hungry person who didn’t realize how much food he actually had):
  1. Purchase and transport buta tank from the local 7anut to your house (allow for 30 minutes).
  2. Open buta tank’s safety seal (allow at least 30 minutes for first time; don’t give up! It’ll get easier with future tanks). You may need to saw it open with your Leatherman. Feel free to listen to the whole soundtrack of Spring Awakening while you work.
  3. Attach one end of hose to the valve and secure with valve clasp (1-2 minutes).
  4. Attach other end of hose to the stove and secure with valve clasp (20-30 minutes, depending on your strength and tenacity).
  5. Screw valve onto buta tank (2 minutes max).
  6. Make guacamole by adding salt to three pitted and mashed avocados, diced tomatoes and onions, and finely chopped cilantro (20 minutes). Store in fridge if you have one yet.
  7. Slice up chicken – breast, thigh, leg – into bite-sized portions (15 minutes).
  8. Tiyb chicken on stove with leftover onion, tomato, and cilantro, and add salt and any other spices at your disposal. Chili pepper and cumin work wonders (20 minutes). Set chicken aside.
  9. Cut potato into thin strips and fry in olive oil with a little salt. Bonus: this is a great way to determine whether your PC-provided smoke detector works (15 minutes).
  10. On a plate, make a bed of guacamole. Place chicken on the guacamole, and top it off with fries fresh from the pan. (3 minutes).
  11. Enjoy with potentially tainted water from your faucet or boxed, unrefrigerated, ultra-pasteurized 0% milk.
Total price: 470.5 DH (around $47), not including the Leatherman.
Total prep and Tiyb time: 2-3 hours, depending on how fast you realize you can saw the safety seal off the buta.

3 Things That Woke Me Up Before My Alarm

Fun fact: The earliest call to prayer happens before sunrise and is the only one of the five that includes the words “Prayer is better than sleep.”

5:40 AM. Call to prayer.

Much like how church bells signal the beginning of a service, Islam has a call to prayer called adhan. A muezzin recites the adhan – often over loudspeakers – five times a day from the minaret of the mosque. The logic behind this is that minarets are typically one of the tallest structures in a city or town, so everyone will hear it and be reminded to pray. The adhan itself is a brief summary of the Muslim faith; it includes the takbir (“God is great”) and the shahada (“there is no god but God, and Muhammad is his messenger”).

Of course, as in many religions, there is theory and there is practice. Though prayers are mandatory five times a day, I have never seen a Moroccan recite prayers immediately following every adhan, neither in public nor in private. It is possible that many men do visit the mosque each time as the koran demands, but clearly many are not doing so. That said, Islam permits people to skip prayers if they absolutely cannot perform them, as long as they make up for it later in the day.

I think I have only slept through this call to prayer once or twice in my first two months here, particularly because I can hear three calls to prayer from my room.


6:30 AM. My host brother’s alarm.

My host family lives in a two-story townhouse above a one-story apartment. My host mom and three host sisters sleep on the top floor as does my younger host brother. I sleep on the lower level in my own room, and my older brother sleeps in the salon next to my room. Because the entrance to both my room and the salon are curtains, I hear his alarm go off every morning at 6:30. Mine is set for 7:30.

The catch? He is a very heavy sleeper. I’m not. And I’m lazy in the mornings. So when his alarm goes off, I don’t go over to turn it off. I just deal with it for about 20 minutes until, without fail, my oldest host sister screams his name from above in order to wake him.
In conversations with other PC trainees, there seems to be a common theme in our host families. The men typically bring in the money while the women tend to spend the money. In this way, the women (in my family, my oldest sister) prioritize purchases and determine what is best for the family. My older sisters control meal times, they keep the house clean, and they make sure both my working brothers wake up in time for work.


img_5007_30411815126_o-01

7:07 AM. Chickens.

There are two chickens in my house. My oldest sister calls them “monsieur” and “madame”, which we both find hilarious. What I don’t find as hilarious is how loud they get in the mornings. They stay in their cage (read: a box with a grill on top) at night, and they really want out as soon as the sun starts peeking under the front door. Their clucks echo up the stone-and-drywall-lined staircase, under the lower floor’s door, and through my bedroom curtain.

Chickens are relatively cheap (I hear you can buy one for 50 dirhams, roughly $5), and eggs can get relatively expensive, so it makes sense for families to own one or two. I don’t yet understand why my family owns a rooster and a hen, but at the very least we get a few eggs a week from “madame”. Perhaps my family sells chicks but it isn’t yet mating season. If any of my readers know anything about chicken breeding, feel free to weigh in on this topic in the comments section.